TripAdvisor: Driving Decisions from Data, to Benefit Both Employees and the Company

Part 2: Aligning HR with Technology and Data / Planning for Acquisitions

Beth Grous, Chief People Officer for TripAdvisor, is applying the same strategy to HR and strategic talent management that TripAdvisor  utilized to become the world’s top travel site: leverage new technology and approaches to gain insights that drive decisions and positive business outcomes. In Beth’s case, that includes everything from recruiting and retaining employees to increasing equity, diversity and inclusion. In this second part of a two-part conversation, Beth talks with TCV General Partner Nari Ansari about the many ways this approach is benefiting both TripAdvisor and its people. Examples include informing business strategy with direct feedback from employees, using smarter benefits and training to retain employees, building a more diverse talent pipeline, and how her team plans for acquisitions so that people management operates effectively during and after integration.

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Nari Ansari:  Beth, thanks for joining us again to discuss TripAdvisor and your talent and people operations journey. We previously talked about aligning HR with business strategy, and jumping back in, I’d love to hear a little bit more about how TripAdvisor is using technology and data in HR operations.

Beth Grous:  Great question, and I can give you some relevant examples across different areas.

Let’s start with employee development. We want to use technology to think about learning differently and less traditionally, and we want to meet the workforce where they are. As one example, we recently began piloting Audible for Business. Employees like to get training delivered to them during their commute or during their downtime; it’s a different approach to content delivery than classroom learning, and one which our employees have embraced.   

Additionally, we seek employee feedback as a key input to how we build and evolve our people programs. We do everything from surveys to monitoring Glassdoor to, and it sounds overly simple, but just talking to people. As much as I love tools and technology, you’d be surprised at how much you learn if you just ask people what’s going on … they’ll generally tell you. And we are increasingly looking to data to help us think about our people in more detailed ways. Let’s use the turnover example. You’re never going to get it to zero attrition, so it’s really about slowing that path to exit and increasing engagement.

One of the recent data-driven insights we had is around the leave of absence journey. When an employee goes out and then returns from leave of absence—particularly one taken to welcome a child into the family—they enter a meaningful period from a retention standpoint. It doesn’t matter whether the employee is the birth parent or not. Our data indicated that one of the most important factors in determining retention during this period was the employee’s relationship with their manager; do they feel supported as they leave and return?  So with this understanding, this past year, we did two things. We increased our benefit level around leaves in general, expanding our leave policies to include a paid caregiver leave: 8 weeks fully paid for caring for a newborn, caring for an ailing family member or elderly parent. For birth moms, who also get an additional 8 weeks of short-term disability pay, this brought our full maternity benefit to 16 weeks; non-birth parents get 8 weeks. We also coupled our leave enhancements with improved manager training. The data gave us insights that if our managers aren’t paying close attention to that transition, your likelihood of losing someone just after a leave of absence increases significantly.

Nari Ansari: Clearly some impactful examples with regards to the use of data to inform your people strategy. Are there any other areas where you have experimented with the use of data to make people-based decisions?

Beth Grous: We’re in stage one—the early phase—of our overall people analytics journey, but I believe we are starting in a very good place. We have robust systems, including Workday and Greenhouse, to capture data. With 3500+ employees, we have scale, which provides a lot of data points. So we’ve got a good basis to work from.

We’re actively thinking about data and analytics and how we apply it to the workplace. Within talent acquisition, we monitor a number of key metrics: How many days does it take us to fill jobs? Where are the pinch points in the various recruiting stages and how can we speed throughput for candidates? I expect that in the future we’re going to be even more intensive about how we aggregate all the signals, both active and passive, around some interesting analytics. I think we’ve barely scratched the surface here. And that’s really exciting.

Nari Ansari:  I think certainly the world is recognizing that business is going to be intensely data-driven, and on the people management and HR side it’s very much heading in that direction as well. As we continue to shift from a manufacturing economy to a knowledge economy, many would argue that people are a corporation’s most important asset. 

Beth Grous: I couldn’t agree more.

Nari Ansari:  Along the lines of employees as a critical asset, one of the things we are also seeing many tech companies grapple with is how to make workforces more diverse. I know at TripAdvisor you have an equity diversity and inclusion department with a responsibility in this arena. Perhaps you can shed light on that department’s role and your organization’s journey.

Beth Grous: It’s an important topic and something many companies are grappling with. My personal macro view is that individual companies need to do much more, but that said, this is not a one-company solve for one-company problem or opportunity. This is an ecosystem opportunity. I think about not just building diverse and inclusive teams here at TripAdvisor but building diverse and inclusive skill sets that help the greater employment ecosystem. I had a new dad tell me recently how grateful he was for our eight fully paid weeks of caregiver leave, because it allowed his working wife to go back to work at her company, and not have to worry about finding a nanny,  childcare center, or a relative to help for those first several weeks she was back to work, because her spouse was able to be home with the baby — because of our benefits. I was excited to hear that our benefit had eased the transition to motherhood for a woman working in another organization.  It is important that all companies — sort of like all boats — rise together.

When we built and crystallized our organizational values back in 2016, one of the values we were explicit on is “We’re Better Together.” We then built a small team in the end of 2016 to focus on equity diversity and inclusion or what we call “ED+I.” In 2018, we looked at the demographics of our workforce, to be clear on our starting point. We asked our workforce what their experience here has been around the topics of equity, inclusion, diversity and belonging to really understand how people are experiencing our workplace. And that information helped inform our initial approach.

Over the last year, one of our insights was that we needed to focus even more purposefully on talent acquisition, which meant providing our recruiting team and our hiring managers with better tools and training around sourcing and recruitment delivery, and around building a diverse pipeline.  You can’t have a more diverse organization if you don’t bring more diverse people into the pipeline. And once they get here, they have to experience an authentic sense of belonging. It’s so obvious, right? And you can’t build a diverse pipeline unless you’re really paying deliberate attention to the talent acquisition process.

Nari Ansari:  That makes sense. And it ties back to our point earlier, that people are the most important asset in companies. When you do an acquisition, it’s a talent acquisition, not just the IP or the customer base. The people are a huge part of it. Most of our portfolio companies do augment their organic growth with inorganic growth as part of their strategy, and these acquisitions can introduce a lot of complexity and challenges from a people management standpoint. What role have you and your HR organization played as you think about strategizing around and integrating these various acquisitions, particularly the ones that are global in nature and may have additional unique complexities as a result?

Beth Grous: We recently acquired Restorando in South America and Bokun in Iceland. Both are companies with teams that are not located near any other TripAdvisor office. I mention this because it’s often easier to integrate acquisitions if you have a local presence in that market already, or a leader from the new parent company who joins the newly acquired team. When organizations do that, people on the acquisition side can see and understand what the parent company is about, through that leader. You have to think about it a bit differently when you’re totally remote from the center or other offices. Our business leaders, for sure, recognize that having a successful integration and change management strategy materially increases the likelihood of that acquisition being successful. So, therefore, the HR teams or people operations teams are very involved in the pre-acquisition planning. We invest a fair amount of time in that upfront planning, and I’m diligent about making sure that people have well-thought out, detailed project plans so that at the appropriate time, you can just enter execution mode and go from there. How do we think about organizational structure? How do we think about Day One change management and culture integration? How much of the TripAdvisor fabric do we superimpose on this acquisition, and how much of the local culture should continue to exist? I think it’s always a really healthy balance of those two things. An acquisition can be both a thrilling and terrifying time for people. There are many unknowns and a lot of uncertainty. Part of what we try to do is bring that human element to the forefront and recognize change management and communication are vital parts of that journey. 

We’ve started to develop a bit of a muscle around acquisition integration. And again, when we’re buying a company, we’re often as excited about the employees and what they bring to the whole of TripAdvisor as we are about the customer base or the part of the industry that they’re in. We’re thrilled to be welcoming these folks to the family, so we try to make it as seamless as possible.

Nari Ansari: Right. I’m glad you used that term, “muscle,” because it’s certainly a term that we think about a lot as we work with our portfolio companies. We also compare conducting acquisitions to building a muscle, and like any muscle, it’s developed and honed over time, through practice and exercise. And I think you get better with each one. TripAdvsior has certainly done enough where you’re seeing pattern recognition and have enhanced your approach on the people side, to ensure things go as smoothly as possible and you get all the good positive impacts you want on the other end.

Beth, my last question is a little more open, because of where you sit at the intersection of technology, people management, consumer internet, and international growth. You see a lot. What else in the world of tech outside of TripAdvisor gets you excited? What are you watching and thinking about in the tech world more broadly?

Beth Grous: Good question. First, I think technology is improving and becoming more integrated into people’s lives. Five years ago, if you had told me that people would be comfortable booking an expensive trip on their little, slow mobile phone, I would have probably raised a bit of a skeptical eyebrow. That was a big transaction to do in that way. And now, we see this happening all the time with our customers. Consumer habits and technology have shifted.

Personally, I’m very excited about the level of innovation in HR technology across the spectrum, whether that means delivering benefits in a different way, new data and analytics approaches, thinking about various talent acquisition strategies, or how we use technology to help us end up with more diverse workforces. The new technology solutions that I see today are very exciting to me as an HR practitioner.   I do think that technology will continue to transform the work of HR and it’s going to have a net positive impact on organizations, which is energizing.

Nari Ansari: As someone who invests in HR technology, I definitely see more interesting things and innovative approaches than in years and decades past. So, lots to be excited about.

Beth Grous: The last thing I’ll add, and I say it to people all the time, I am so lucky to have the opportunity to do this work in this company. It’s really fun. I’ve got a great team and work with a great team of executives. And for that, I’m very grateful.

Nari Ansari: That’s great to hear. We are very proud to have TripAdvisor in the TCV portfolio. Thanks so much for sharing your thoughts with us.

Beth Grous: My pleasure!

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The statements, views, and opinions expressed are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of TCMI, Inc. or its affiliates (“TCV”). TCV has not verified the accuracy of any statements by the speakers and disclaims any responsibility therefor. This interview is not an offer to sell or the solicitation of an offer to purchase an interest in any private fund managed or sponsored by TCV or any of the securities of any company discussed. The TCV portfolio companies identified, if any, are not necessarily representative of all TCV investments and no assumption should be made that the investments identified were or will be profitable. For a complete list of TCV investments, please visit www.tcv.com/all-companies. For additional important disclaimers, please see “Informational Purposes Only” in the Terms of Use for TCV’s website, available at http://www.tcv.com/terms-of-use/.


TripAdvisor: Elevating People Functions to Business Partnership

Part 1: Aligning HR with Business Strategy

When Beth Grous joined TripAdvisor as Chief People Officer, the popular travel platform was growing rapidly, with 40+ locations around the world. Beth quickly moved to develop Human Resources (HR) as a strategic partner for business functions, so that the team’s initiatives would more directly support company objectives. In this first part of a two-part conversation, Beth talks with TCV GP Nari Ansari about how she re-oriented her team for business partnership. She also explains how her team manages the employee journey within TripAdvisor as strategically as the company manages its customer journeys, so that recruiting and retaining talent is both systematic and flexible for an increasingly diverse workforce.

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Nari Ansari: First off Beth, I really appreciate you taking the time to chat with us. It was great seeing you at TCV’s East Coast CHRO event in New York with portfolio company people and talent leaders. We had some great conversations and wanted to share a few topics with a broader audience.

Beth Grous: Absolutely. Great to speak again.

Nari Ansari: Let’s dive right in, starting with TripAdvisor. What does the company do?

Beth Grous: I think most people who have traveled, or know someone that’s traveled, are familiar with TripAdvisor. We are the world’s largest travel platform. We help about 490 million travelers every month plan, book, and get excited about having the best trip of their life. We’re a global website, and we also have a mobile app that helps travelers browse more than three-quarters of a billion reviews and opinions on over eight million restaurants, accommodations, experiences, airlines, cruises, and so on.

Nari Ansari: When did you join? What motivated you to jump onboard?

Beth Grous: I joined TripAdvisor in September of 2015. I’ve been a review writing member on the TripAdvisor platform since 2006 so I was a long-time consumer of the brand and loved it. When I got the call about the job, I thought that it would be a unique opportunity for me to take the HR skills, experience and capabilities that I had, and intersect them with a consumer brand that I have a lot of passion for.

Around the same time frame there was an increasing recognition at TripAdvisor that with 2,500 employees, and the company growing globally, we really needed to elevate the people function to work in partnership with the CEO to execute more strategically against our business and talent priorities. And so that was very exciting for me as well, thinking about the potential impact I could have.

Nari Ansari: Absolutely. You’re titled Chief People Officer, so what areas fall under your responsibility?

Beth Grous: That’s a great question, because my job description is perhaps a little different than most heads of HR.

As Chief People Officer, I have all the traditional HR domains:

  • HR business partners
  • Total rewards (compensation and benefits) and HR systems
  • Talent acquisition (our recruiting engine)
  • Learning and organizational development
  • Equity, diversity, and inclusion

In addition to those more typical functions, I have a few other areas of responsibility, including our global real estate portfolio and office experience for our 40+ offices worldwide, and our social impact function, which is a combination of both our TripAdvisor Charitable Foundation and our employee volunteerism and giving activities.

Nari Ansari: Since you became Chief People Officer, how have you established the HR team as a business partner to the rest of the organization? What steps did you take, what lessons did you learn as you industrialized the function, and what advice would you have for other HR leaders of growing tech companies out there?

Beth Grous: When I joined, I looked around and I said, “There are some places where we have real strengths, and some places where we need to fill in some blanks.” Probably the biggest shift we made was to build out an HR business partner (HRBP) function – we wanted to shift a portion of our team from being more focused on tactical day-to-day priorities to taking a pro-active focus towards business objectives and working with their counterparts throughout the organization. That shift in focus meant that some people stepped up to develop their skills and to work differently. Other team members transitioned out of the organization and, also importantly, we had a few members join from the business side.  It was a significant shift to staff and organize this HR business partner team.

Nari Ansari: That’s an impressive shift. Tell us a bit more about the role and skill set of HR business partners.

Beth Grous: The members of our HRBP team are expected to have a deep understanding of the business—financials, strategy, and how each business function aligns and interacts to execute against those objectives. I encourage the HRBP team to frame their day-to-day work by asking the question: “How am I working with people at all levels of the organization to help drive the business forward?” Much of this learning happens on the job—and our business leaders are very supportive of sharing their expertise. It has been an important shift for us, because with this knowledge and understanding, they can then support the business most effectively: defining the right organizational structure to support strategy, ensuring that we are hiring and developing a diverse and talented group of employees across the organization, and aligning rewards, as some examples.

I am fortunate that I work for a CEO and with an executive team who greatly values the input of our people and human capital team on matters not just related to HR domain areas, but also matters related to the overall business. This has been exciting and fulfilling for me and my team.

Nari Ansari: That’s great. I think what’s top of mind for many company leaders and talent leaders is retaining exceptional talent. You talked a bit at our recent TCV CHRO event that TripAdvisor very methodically thinks through, manages, and monitors the customer journey and that you and your team symmetrically are methodically thinking through, managing, and monitoring the employee journey as well. Can you talk a little bit more about what that looks like for your 3,600 plus TripAdvisor team members today spread across 40+ offices?

Beth Grous: I’m going to make an obvious statement here. If you retain and engage more of your workforce, you have less of a need to recruit people…

Nari Ansari: Right.

Beth Grous: We recognize that those two things sit in a very healthy and logical balance. We also recognize that turnover in and of itself is painful. You lose institutional knowledge. It’s disruptive to teams. It slows throughput. It slows innovation. We’re only as good as the people that we have working in the right teams and right configurations to execute against our business objective. We think a lot about how to make TripAdvisor a great place to work, to encourage not only retention, but also to drive engagement and satisfaction. Just like our sales team thinks about the “customer first”, we think about how we can put our employees first. That also means that we are taking their views into account, so it’s not just about delivering “HR services” to our employees but having a dialogue with them. This aligns with our brand, which is all about transparency and providing honest and constructive feedback. For example, we know that what makes a company a great place to work likely means different things to different people. To someone early in their career, that might mean, “I get to have a lot of different experiences and I’m promoted pretty rapidly.” To someone in a different phase of life or with different interests or needs, that might be that an individual wants a lot of flexibility in terms of the hours when they work or the places where they work. We encourage flexibility, and we also have office spaces with many different places where people can get away from their desks if that helps them work more effectively. We think about our workforce just like TripAdvisor (and many consumer-facing companies) think about their customers, recognizing that one size doesn’t fit all. That does not mean that we can necessarily be all things to all people—but we try hard to listen, learn, and discern what’s most important to our workforce, and meet our employees’ needs, as long as it makes sense for the business. 

I believe that there are some things that transcend all employees, regardless of role, experience or tenure. Employees want to come to work at a place where they understand the business objectives, they understand the strategy, and they know their role, how their role ladders up to executing against that strategy. So as a company, we spend a ton of time being transparent about those elements – we do that through company town halls, through company meetings and through various forms of communication. Communication is so important, and I don’t think we can ever do enough of it internally! We’ve found it critical for our employees to understand the business context and importantly, how they fit into that context, so that they can be most successful—and therefore we can be most successful as a company.

Nari Ansari:  That makes a lot of sense. I do think that having a much more rigorous multi-faceted view of your employee base is becoming critical for companies of all sizes and in all industries.  And I also think open communication across the organization is important, particularly when it feels like change is the only constant these days.

Another trend – and transition – we are seeing is that HR is becoming more tech and data driven to deliver on human capital and business goals. We’ll talk more about this in a follow-up Q&A and address other topics that are top of mind for today’s HR professionals and tech companies, including HR’s role in successfully executing acquisitions. Thanks so much for sharing your thoughts with us, and I look forward to our next conversation.

Beth Grous: My pleasure!

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The statements, views, and opinions expressed are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of TCMI, Inc. or its affiliates (“TCV”). TCV has not verified the accuracy of any statements by the speakers and disclaims any responsibility therefor. This interview is not an offer to sell or the solicitation of an offer to purchase an interest in any private fund managed or sponsored by TCV or any of the securities of any company discussed. The TCV portfolio companies identified, if any, are not necessarily representative of all TCV investments and no assumption should be made that the investments identified were or will be profitable. For a complete list of TCV investments, please visit www.tcv.com/all-companies. For additional important disclaimers, please see “Informational Purposes Only” in the Terms of Use for TCV’s website, available at http://www.tcv.com/terms-of-use/.